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Elk Grove USD  |  AR  5030  Students

Wellness   

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I. Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC)

The school district will create, strengthen, or work within the Wellness Advisory Committee (formerly Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP) Advisory Committee) to develop, implement, monitor, review, and, as necessary, revise school nutrition, physical activity and social, emotional and psychological well- being policies. The WAC will also serve as a resource to school sites for implementing those policies. The Wellness Advisory Committee (WAC) will consist of a group of individuals representing the school and community, and should include parents, students, teachers, school food service professionals, school administrators, Board representatives, health professionals, and members of the public.

The following eight components contribute to the health and well-being of students and comprise the areas of responsibility for the Wellness Advisory Committee (CSHP Advisory committee).

1. Health Education: A planned, sequential K-12 curriculum that addresses the physical, mental, emotional, and social dimensions of health. The curriculum is designed to motivate and assist students to maintain and improve their health, prevent disease, and reduce health-related risk behaviors.

2. Physical Education: A planned, sequential K-12 curriculum that provides cognitive content and learning experiences in a variety of activity areas such as basic movement skills; physical fitness; rhythms and dance; games; team, dual, and individual sports; and gymnastics.

3. Health Services: Services provided to students to appraise, protect, and promote health. These services are designed to ensure access or referral to primary health care services or both, foster appropriate use of primary health care services, prevent and control communicable disease and other health problems, provide emergency care for illness or injury, promote and provide optimum sanitary conditions for safe school facility and environment, and provide educational and counseling opportunities for promoting and maintaining individual, family, and community health.

4. Nutrition Services: Access to a variety of nutritious and appealing meals that accommodate the health and nutrition of all students.

5. Mental Health and Social services: Services provided to improve students' mental, emotional, and social health. These services include individual and group assessments, interventions, and referrals.

6. Healthy and Safe School Environment: The physical and aesthetic surroundings and the psychosocial climate and culture of the school. Factors that influence the physical environment include the school building and the area surrounding it, any biological or chemical agents that are detrimental to health, and physical conditions such as temperature, noise, and lighting. The psychological environment includes the physical, emotional, and social conditions that affect the well-being of students and staff.

7. Health Promotion for Staff: Opportunities for school staff to improve their health status through activities such as health assessments, health education, and health-related activities.

8. Family and Community Involvement: An integrated school, parent, and community approach for enhancing the health and well-being of students. Schools actively solicit parent involvement and engage community resources and services to respond more effectively to the health-related needs of students.

II. Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages Sold and Served on Campus

School Meals

Meals served through the National School Breakfast and Lunch Programs (NSBLP) and Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) will:

o Be appealing and attractive to children;

o Be served in clean and pleasant settings;

o Meet, at a minimum, nutrition requirements established by local, state, and federal statutes and regulations;

o Offer a variety of fruits and vegetables;

o Serve only low-fat (1%) and fat-free milk and nutritionally-equivalent non-dairy alternatives (as defined by USDA);

o Ensure all grains served are at least 51% whole grain;

o Provide products that contain no trans fat and are labeled as such;

o Give preference to products grown, processed, and/or packaged in California; and

o Provide nutrition information for products offered in snack bars, a la carte, vending and school stores upon request.

Food and Nutrition Services should engage students and parents, through taste-tests of new entrees and surveys, in selecting foods including culturally representative sold through the school meal programs in order to identify new, healthful, and appealing food choices.

In addition, Food and Nutrition Services will share information about the nutritional content of meals with parents and students upon request.

Breakfast. Encourage all students to eat breakfast, either at home or at school, in order to meet their nutritional needs and enhance their ability to learn:

o Schools will, to the extent possible, operate the National School Breakfast Program.

o Schools will, to the extent possible, arrange bus schedules and utilize methods to serve school breakfasts that encourage participation.

o Schools that serve breakfast will notify parents and students of the availability of the National School Breakfast Program.

o Schools will encourage parents to provide a healthy breakfast for their children through newsletter articles, take-home materials, or other means.

Free and Reduced-priced Meals. Schools will make every effort to eliminate any social stigma attached to, and prevent the overt identification of, students who are eligible for free and reduced-price school meals. Toward this end, schools may utilize electronic identification and payment systems; promote the availability of school meals to all students; and/or use nontraditional methods for serving school meals.

Meal Times and Scheduling. Schools will, whenever possible:

o Provide students with at least 10 minutes to eat after being served for breakfast and 20 minutes after being served for lunch;

o Avoid scheduling tutoring, club and other activities during mealtimes, unless students are provided an opportunity to eat during such activities;

o Will schedule meal periods at appropriate times, and lunch must be scheduled between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.;

o Will, to the extent possible, provide students access to hand washing or hand sanitizing before they eat meals or snacks; and

o Will have drinking water available within meal service areas.

Qualifications of School Food and Nutrition Services Staff. Qualified food service professionals will administer the school meal programs. As part of the school district's responsibility to operate a food and nutrition services program, we will provide continuing professional development for all food service professionals in schools. Staff development programs should include appropriate certification and/or training programs for child nutrition directors, school nutrition managers, and cafeteria workers, according to their levels of responsibility.

Sharing of Foods and Beverages. Schools should discourage students from sharing their foods or beverages with one another during meal or snack times, given concerns about the spread of disease, allergies and other dietary restrictions.

Foods and Beverages Sold Individually*

*i.e., foods sold outside of reimbursable school meals, such as through vending machines, cafeteria a la carte [snack] lines, fundraisers, school stores, etc.

The Board authorizes the Superintendent or designee to approve the sale of foods and beverages outside of the district's food service program, including sales by student or school-connected organizations, sales through vending machines, and/or sales at secondary school student stores for fundraising purposes.

Elementary Schools. The school food service program will approve and provide all food and beverage sales to students in elementary schools. Given young children's limited nutrition skills, food in elementary schools should be sold as balanced meals. If available, foods and beverages sold individually, outside of the USDA meal program, should be limited items meeting the following criteria:

o Not more than 35% of its total calories from fat.*

o Less than 10% calories from saturated fat*, and

o Not more than 35% sugar by weight*, and

o Less than 0.5 grams trans fat per serving, and

o Not more than 230 milligrams sodium, and

o Not more than 175 calories per individual food item.

AND

o The food product sold is a fruit, non-fried vegetable, dairy food, allowable protein (nuts, seeds, legumes, eggs, or cheese) or whole grain item**

Regardless of the time of the school day, only the following beverages may be sold to a student at an elementary school:

o Fruit-based drinks that are composed of no less than 50% fruit juice and have no added sweetener and are no greater than 8 fl. oz. serving size.

o Vegetable-based drinks that are composed of no less than 50% vegetable juice and have no added sweetener and are no greater than 8 fl. oz. serving size.

o Drinking water with no added sweetener.

o One-percent-fat milk (unflavored), nonfat milk (flavored or unflavored)**

o Non-Dairy milk (nutritionally equivalent to milk)**

* Refer to California Department of Education website http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/nu/he/documents/compfoodrefcard.doc Competitive Food Sales Quick Reference Cards for exemptions to listed standards.

** Refer to California Department of Education website Competitive Food Sales Quick Reference Cards for additional specifications on listed standards.

An elementary school may permit the sale of food or beverage items that do not comply with the above regulations as part of a school fund raising event in any of the following circumstances:

o The items are sold by students of the school and the sale of those items takes place off of and away from school premises.

o Non compliant foods and beverages cannot be sold from midnight to one-half hour after the school day.

o The sale must meet California Code of Regulations Section 15500 for student organizations.

Middle School and High Schools: All foods and beverages sold individually outside the reimbursable school meal programs (including those sold through a la carte [snack] lines, vending machines, student stores, or fundraising activities) during the school day, or through programs for students from midnight to 30 minutes after the school day, will meet the following nutrition and portion size standards:

Snacks sold to students in middle schools and high schools, except food served as part of the USDA meal program, shall meet all of the following standards:

o Not more than 35% of its total calories from fat * and

o Less than 10% calories from saturated fat * and

o Not more than 35% sugar by weight * and

o Less than 0.5 grams trans fat per serving, and

o Not more than 230 milligrams sodium, and

o Not more than 200 calories per individual food item.

AND must meet ONE of the following:

o The food product sold is a fruit, vegetable, dairy, protein, or whole grain item* (or have one of these as the first ingredient), or

o Contain 10% or more Daily Value for calcium or potassium or Vitamin D or dietary fiber (criteria applicable through 6/30/16), or

o Be a combination food containing at least 1/4 cup fruit or vegetable.

Entr裠items sold to pupils in middle school or high school, except food served as part of the USDA meal program, shall meet all of the following standards:

o Meat/meat alternate and whole grain rich food; or

o Meat/meat alternate and fruit or non-fried vegetable; or

o Meat/meat alternate alone (cannot be yogurt, cheese, nuts, seeds, or meat snacks = these are considered a "snack").

AND:

o Not more than 35% calories from fat, and

o Less than 10% calories from saturated fat, and

o Not more than 35% sugar by weight, and

o Less than 0.5 grams trans fat per serving, and

o Not more than 480 milligrams sodium, and

o Contain no more 350 calories.

AND must meet ONE of the following:

o The food product sold is a fruit, vegetable, dairy, protein, or whole grain item* (or have one of these as the first ingredient), or

o Contain 10% or more Daily Value for calcium or potassium or Vitamin D or dietary fiber (criteria applicable through 6/30/16), or

o Be a combination food containing at least 1/4 cup fruit or vegetable.

An individual entr裠sold by the District/School Food Service the day of or day after it appears in the reimbursable meal program menu must contain no more than 400 calories, no more than 4 grams of fat per 100 calories and have less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving.

Beverages - From midnight to one-half hour after the end of the school day, only the following beverages may be sold to students at a middle school or high school:

o Fruit-based drinks that are composed of no less than 50% fruit juice, have no added sweetener and no more than 12 fl. oz. serving size.

o Vegetable-based drinks that are composed of no less than 50% vegetable juice, have no added sweetener and no more than 12 fl. oz. serving size.

o One-percent-fat milk (unflavored), nonfat milk (flavored or unflavored). **

o Non-Dairy milk (nutritionally equivalent to milk) **

o Drinking water with no added sweetener.

o No-calorie electrolyte replacement beverage (High School Only) **

o Low-calorie electrolyte replacement beverage (High School Only) **

*Refer to California Department of Education website http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/nu/he/documents/compfoodrefcard.doc

Competitive Food Sales Quick Reference Cards for exemptions to listed standards.

** Refer to California Department of Education website Competitive Food Sales Quick Reference Cards for additional specifications on listed standards.

A middle school or high school may permit the sale of food or beverage items that do not comply with the above regulations as part of a school fund raising event in any of the following circumstances:

o The sale of those items takes place away from school premises.

o The items are sold by students of the school and the sale of those items takes place at least half hour after the end of the school day. Non compliant foods and beverages cannot be sold from midnight to one-half hour after the school day.

o The sale must meet California Code of Regulations Section 15500 for student organizations.

Fundraising Activities. To support children's health and school nutrition-education efforts, school fundraising activities are encouraged to explore healthy options. Schools will encourage fundraising activities that promote physical activity. The school district will make available a list of ideas for healthy fundraising activities.

During the school day:

Competitive Food regulations apply to ALL foods sold to students by ANY entity.

Any foods and beverages sold on any school campus must meet the nutrition and portion size standards as required by USDA guidelines as well as SB 12 and SB 965.

Sold means the exchange of food for money, coupons, vouchers, or order forms, when any part of the exchange occurs on a school campus.

(Reference Ed Code sections 49430, 49431.2, 49431.7, California Code of Regulations sections 15575, 15577, 15578, Code of Federal Regulations sections 210.11, 220.12)

Student organizations must also follow competitive food sale regulations as listed in the CCR 15500 & 15501. Food items may not be prepared on the premises. ("Prepared on the premises" refers to the heating or re-heating and service of hot food and /or beverage items such as instant soup, hot chocolate, microwave popcorn, or pizza), and must adhere to the following guidelines:

Elementary- The sale of food for fundraising is limited to no more than four food sales per school year and are limited to a single item on those four days. The sale must also occur after the lunch period has ended.

Secondary- The sale of food for fundraising is limited to one organization each school day selling no more than three categories.

In addition to one student organization sale each day, any and all student organizations may sell compliant food items no more than 4 days during a school year in each school, but such sales shall be held on the same four days for any or all organizations.

30 minutes after school, evenings and weekends:

Elementary and Secondary - Schools are encouraged to select fundraising activities that involve the sale of healthy food and/or focus on physical activity.

Snacks. Schools receiving snacks and/or suppers through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) will receive a snack and/or supper that meets USDA guidelines. Snacks and/or suppers served in after-school care or enrichment programs Schools will assess if and when to offer snacks based on timing of school meals, students' nutritional needs, children's ages, and other considerations.

Schools not eligible for snacks and/or suppers through the CACFP At-Risk meal program should provide snacks that will make a positive contribution to students' diets and health, with an emphasis on serving fruits and vegetables as the primary snacks and water or milk as the primary beverage. The district will make available a list of healthful snack items to teachers, on-site daycare providers and parents.

Food Incentives on Campus. Staff should not use foods or beverages, especially those that do not meet the nutrition standards for foods and beverages sold individually (above), as rewards for academic performance or good behavior,4 and will not withhold food or beverages (including food served through school meals) as a punishment.

Celebrations. The Board recognizes that class parties are a tradition in public education. However, parents and staff are encouraged to provide party snack items that are consistent with the goals of the policy and schedule celebrations after the lunch hour whenever possible. The district will disseminate a list of healthy party ideas to parents and teachers.

III. Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion and Food Marketing

Nutrition Education and Promotion. Elk Grove Unified School District aims to teach, encourage, and support healthy eating by students. Schools should provide nutrition education and engage in nutrition promotion that:

o Is offered at each grade level as part of a sequential, comprehensive, standards-based program designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to promote and protect their health;

o Is part of not only health education classes, but also classroom instruction in subjects such as math, science, language arts, social sciences, and elective subjects;

o Includes enjoyable, developmentally-appropriate, culturally-relevant, participatory activities, such as contests, promotions, taste testing, tours of the FNS Central Kitchen, grocery store tours, farm visits, Certified Farmers' Markets visits, and school gardens;

o Promotes fruits, vegetables, whole grain products, low-fat and fat-free dairy products, healthy food preparation methods, and health-enhancing nutrition practices;

o Promotes the consumption of healthy beverages by providing access to free, safe drinking water and encouraging students to consume beverages that meet current nutrition guidelines.

o Emphasizes caloric balance between food intake and energy expenditure (physical activity/exercise);

o Links with school meal programs, other school foods, and nutrition-related community services;

o Teaches media literacy with an emphasis on food marketing; and

o Includes training for teachers and other staff.

Physical Activity Opportunities. For students to receive the nationally-recommended amount of daily physical activity (i.e., at least 60 minutes per day (24-hour period)) and for students to fully embrace regular physical activity as a personal behavior, students need opportunities for physical activity beyond physical education class. Toward that end:

o Schools should encourage student's participation in at least 60 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity (which may include physical education instruction) in accordance with nationally recommended guidelines.

After-school programs should include supervised, age-appropriate physical activities that appeal to a variety of interests.

o Schools should ensure that students have adequate space and equipment to participate in structured physical activity.

o Schools should ensure that physical activity facilities on school grounds are kept safe and well maintained.

o Schools should provide information to parents to help them promote and incorporate physical activity and healthy eating into their children's lives.

o Teachers and other school and community personnel will not use physical activity (e.g., running laps, pushups) or withhold opportunities for physical activity (e.g. physical education) as punishment. (California Education Code Section 49001)

o Whenever possible, elementary schools should provide daily recess that encourages physical activity.

o The school/district shall establish rules and procedures concerning safety during physical activity for students and staff and assign responsibility for these rules and procedures appropriately.

o The school district should assess students' ability to safely walk and bike to school and should collaborate with local public works, public safety, and/or police departments in achieving safe routes for walking and biking to school.

Communications with Parents. The district/school will support parents' efforts to provide a healthy diet and daily physical activity for their children. The district/school may offer healthy eating education for parents, and provide nutrient analyses of school menus. Schools should encourage parents who pack lunches and snacks to refrain from including beverages and foods that do not meet the above nutrition standards for individual foods and beverages.

The district/school will provide information about physical education and other school-based physical activity opportunities before, during, and after the school day; and support parents' efforts to provide their children with opportunities to be physically active outside of school. Such supports will include sharing information about physical activity and physical education through a website, newsletter, or other take-home materials, special events, or physical education homework.

Food Marketing in Schools. School-based marketing will be consistent with nutrition education and health promotion. As such, schools will limit food and beverage marketing to the promotion of foods and beverages that meet the nutrition standards for meals or for foods and beverages sold individually.

School-based marketing of brands promoting predominantly low-nutrition foods and beverages is prohibited. The promotion of healthy foods is encouraged according to the USDA guidelines.

Staff Wellness. Elk Grove Unified School District highly values the health and well-being of every staff member and will plan and implement activities and policies that support personal efforts by staff to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

When possible a staff/site wellness committee will be formed. The committee should develop, promote, and oversee a multifaceted plan to promote staff health and wellness.

The plan should be based on input solicited from staff and should outline ways to encourage healthy eating, physical activity, and other elements of a healthy lifestyle among school staff. The staff wellness committee should network with the Coordinated School Health Program Advisory Committee and share the results of their plan.

Physical Education (P.E.) K-12. Elk Grove Unified School District aims to teach, encourage, and support physical education for students. Schools will provide physical education according to the guidelines.

o All children shall have access to a high-quality, comprehensive, and developmentally appropriate physical education program on a regular basis. (California Education Code Section 51210.1 (e)(2))

o At the elementary school level, all students shall receive 200 minutes of quality physical education instruction every 10 school days. (California Education Code Section 51210)

o At the middle school and high school levels, students will receive 400 minutes of quality physical education instruction every 10 school days unless a waiver is approved by the California Department of Education. (California Education Code Sections 51222 & 51223)

o High school students must complete 20 credits of physical education to receive their diplomas. Effective July 1, 2007, all high school students are required to take physical education continuously until they pass the California physical performance test, regardless of the number of credits earned. (California Education Code Sections 51241 and 51222)

o All 9 grade students are required to take physical education, the year they will be required to take the California physical performance test.

o Effective July 1, 2007, all students who pass the physical performance test in the 9th grade, may then take their second year of physical education any time during grades 10-12. (California Education Code Section 51241 (b) (1))

o Students who fail the physical performance test in the 9th grade must take physical education in the 10th grade, when they will be required to take the physical performance test again.

o If they pass the California physical performance test in the 10th grade and have passed 20 credits of physical education, they will have completed the graduation requirement.

o If they fail the test in the 10th grade, they will be required to continue in physical education until they pass this mandatory physical performance test.

o It is not a graduation requirement to pass the California physical performance test.

o All schools will report Fitnessgram results in the annual school accountability report. (California Education Code Section 60800 (e))

o Schools will ensure that physical education class size is consistent with the requirements of good instruction and safety. (California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Section 10060 (f))

o The Elk Grove Unified School District will offer, on-going, professional development activities for all teachers who instruct physical education.

o The Elk Grove Unified School District will encourage schools to have their students meet the minimum fitness standards at all grade levels.

V. Social, Emotional, and Psychological Well-Being

OVERVIEW

The district affirms the importance of teaching students to be both physically and mentally healthy, and creating and maintaining a school environment that promotes academic achievement and helps promote a healthy community. When schools attend systematically to students' social and emotional skills, the academic achievement of children increases, the incidence of problem behaviors decreases, and the quality of relationships surrounding each child improves.

MEANS USED TO PROMOTE WELLNESS

Every school should institutionalize school-wide systems, such as positive behavior supports (PBS), that teach Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and that support student wellness, student achievement, social emotional character traits, positive school climate, and positive attendance. SEL is the process through which students learn to recognize and manage emotions, care about others, make good decisions, behave ethically and responsibly, develop positive relationships, and avoid negative behaviors.

It is the process through which students enhance their ability to integrate thinking, feeling, and behaving in order to achieve important life tasks. Therefore, the school-wide systems should teach students the following characteristics and skills:

1. Self-Awareness: Knowing what we are feeling in the moment, and having a realistic assessment of our own abilities and a well-grounded sense of self-confidence.

2. Self-Management: Handling our emotions so they facilitate rather than interfere with the task at hand, being conscientious and delaying gratification to pursue goals, persevering in the face of setbacks and frustrations.

3. Social Awareness: Understanding what others are feeling, being able to take their perspective, appreciating and interacting positively with diverse groups.

4. Social Management: Handling emotions in relationships effectively, and establishing and maintaining healthy and rewarding relationships based on cooperation, resistance to inappropriate social pressure, negotiating solutions to conflict, and seeking help when needed.

Within the school setting, SEL can best be accomplished through a layered approach of skills lessons, infusion into the curricula and classroom practices, and an environment of safety, respect, and caring which models the following SEL values:

Safe Learning Environment

Each student learns in an environment that is physically and emotionally safe for students and adults.

1. Maintaining/and providing school buildings, grounds, playground equipment, and vehicles which are secure and meet all established safety and environmental standards.

2. Establishing a physical, emotional, academic, and social school climate is safe, friendly, and student-centered.

3. Establishing a school climate where students feel valued, respected, and cared for and are motivated to learn.

4. School staff, students, and family members

o Establish and maintain school and classroom behavioral expectations, rules, and routines that teach students how to manage their behavior and help students improve problem behavior.

o Are provided with regular opportunities for learning and support in teaching students how to manage their own behavior, and reinforcing expectations, rules, and routines.

o Are provided opportunities to practice social-emotional skills, including effective listening, conflict resolution, problem solving, personal reflection and responsibility, and ethical decision-making.

o Upholds social justice and equity concepts and practices mutual respect for individual differences at all levels of school interactions, student-to-student, adult-to-student, and adult-to-adult.

5. Ensuring that school climate, curriculum, and instruction reflect both high expectations and an understanding of child and adolescent growth and development.

High Expectations

All staff should believe that every student is capable of meeting the highest behavioral and academic expectations. Students must be encouraged to set their own high expectations and be confident that they can reach their goals by:

1. Developing a culture that all members of the school community will be held to high expectations and clearly communicate those expectations.

2. Encouraging all staff to expect that all students have the potential to be successful.

3. Treating all students as learners, providing encouragement, and expecting students to meet their fullest potential.

4. Treating staff as professionals and expecting staff to meet the highest standards for their profession.

5. Ensuring each student has access to challenging, comprehensive curriculum in all content areas.

6. Ensuring curriculum and instruction provide opportunities for students to develop critical-thinking and reasoning skills, problem solving competencies, and technology proficiency.

7. Working with families to help all students understand the connection between education and lifelong success.

8. Ensuring that curriculum and instruction include evidence-based strategies to prepare students for further education, career, and citizenship.

9. Ensuring that extracurricular, co-curricular, and community-based programs provide students with experiences relevant to higher education, career, and citizenship.

10. Ensuring that curriculum and instruction develop are provided to help students' global awareness and competencies, including understanding of language and culture.

Social Competence and Connectedness

Students and families should feel welcomed and included in order to be successful. Through mentoring, unconditional caring and connectedness, schools can build relationships. Schools should increase bonds between staff, students and their families by:

1. Creating opportunities for every student to build significant relationships with adults on campus through positive communication and mentoring.

2. Implementing culturally and linguistically relevant strategies to promote student connectedness and cultural competence.

3. Encouraging and nurturing parents' involvement and participation in their children's education through collaboration, volunteerism, and membership on school councils.

4. Helping parents understand their critical role in the development of their child's sense of value within the home, school, and community.

5. Teaching students to handle emotions in relationships effectively by establishing and maintaining healthy and rewarding relationships based on cooperation, exercising resistance to inappropriate social pressure, negotiating solutions to conflict, and seeking help when needed.

6. Offering a range of opportunities for students to contribute to and learn within the community at large, including service learning, internships, apprenticeships, and volunteer projects.

7. Promoting school policies and climate that reinforce citizenship and civic behaviors by students, family members, and staff and include meaningful participation in decision-making.

8. Ensuring each student in our school has access to a range of options and choices for a wide array of extracurricular and co-curricular activities that reflect student interests, goals, and learning profiles.

9. Ensuring that curriculum and instruction promote students' understanding of the real-world, global relevance and application of learned content.

10. Expecting that students are prepared to assume age-appropriate responsibility for learning through effective decision-making, goal setting, and time management.

11. Assisting schools in supporting, promoting, and reinforcing responsible environmental habits through recycling, trash management, sustainable energy, and other efforts.

Opportunities for Meaningful Participation

Students that feel part of the school and community are more engaged in learning. Opportunities for meaningful participation foster intrinsic motivation and a sense of ownership with the school and community. Schools can create opportunities by:

1. Creating opportunities for all students to participate in leadership, clubs, sports, and/or other school activities.

2. Promoting service learning through flexible scheduling options, opportunities offered in the curriculum and community partnerships.

3. Encouraging students to contribute to the school and community through volunteerism, service learning, and teamwork.

4. Recognizing, promoting, and rewarding student contributions to the school and community.

Helping Students Develop a Sense of Purpose and Future

Students need to understand the connection between education and their future. Schools should support students in setting guided short- and long-term goals. Schools should promote sense of purpose and future by:

1. Encouraging an optimistic outlook for the future of all students.

2. Utilizing advisory periods for goal setting and giving examples of success through motivational speakers and alumni success stories.

3. Providing opportunities for students to participate in leadership, college visitations, and career and vocational planning.

4. Ensuring all secondary students has the opportunity to meet with grade-level staff, counselors, or other appropriate personnel a minimum of two times per year for the purpose of academic and career planning.

Clear and Consistent Boundaries

School rules are clearly established, communicated, and consistently enforced in school policies, staff follow through, and school- wide positive support.  Schools can establish clear and consistent boundaries by:

1. Ensuring all members of the school community have a clear understanding of school policies, guiding principles, and positive behavior supports.

2. Developing a partnership with staff, parents, and the community to support school rules, policies, and guiding principles.

3. Posting developmentally appropriate district, school, and classroom guiding principles throughout the campus and clearly communicate these to all stakeholders.

4. Implementing research-based positive behavior support strategies.

Teaching and Reinforcing Social-Emotional and Life Skills

Promote the well-being of students and the development of their sense of self by teaching them the necessary skills required to be successful in life by:

1. Incorporating opportunities to build social-emotional skills within the core curriculum.

2. Helping students understand the link between physical fitness, good health practices, positive body image, and self-esteem.

3. Providing students with opportunities to practice learned skills, advocate among their peers, and have leadership opportunities in the school and community.

4. Teaching social-emotional skills and nonviolent conflict resolution skills.

5. Educating teachers and administrators about the impact of social-emotional challenges on academic performance and behavior.

6. Using a range of diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment tasks to monitor student progress, provide timely feedback, and adjust teaching-learning activities to maximize student progress.

7. Ensuring that adult-student relationships support and encourage each student's academic and personal growth.

8. Ensuring students have access to school counselors and other structured academic, social, and emotional support systems.

9. Ensuring that school staff understands and makes curricular, instructional, and school improvement decisions based on child and adolescent development and student performance information.

10. Using a variety of methods across languages and cultures to communicate with all families and community members about the school's vision, mission, goals, activities and opportunities for students.

11. Helping families understand available services, advocate for their children's needs, and support their children's learning.

12. Ensuring that all adults who interact with students both within the school and through extracurricular, co-curricular, and community-based experiences teach and model pro-social behavior.

School-wide Screening and Early Identification of Problems

In order to prevent the escalation of social-emotional problems, schools should have methods and procedures for screening and early identification of behavioral problems. Schools should promote early identification by:

1. Establishing a multidisciplinary team that is charged with identifying students needing support, developing intervention strategies, monitoring, implementing school and community resources, and evaluating the effectiveness of support services.

2. Helping staff become more aware of behaviors and health conditions that may require mental health or medical interventions and/or support.

3. Developing systems to assess the wellness of all students.

4. Conducting mental health screenings and assessments of students for classroom preferred behaviors and trauma.

Coordination of School and Community Resources

Schools should establish community-based partnerships to coordinate and provide support to all students. Supports should meet the individual needs of students who are struggling with academic, attitude (behavior), and/or attendance problems by:

1. Utilizing community-based resources to supplement student support services that promote student wellness.

2. Assuring that support service personnel have sufficient time to communicate and collaborate in order to ensure the best use of available resources and the delivery of services.

3. Utilizing staff development time to discuss students' academic, social, and emotional needs across grade levels and during transitions between schools to ensure coordinated support.

Comprehensive Student Support Programs

Schools should develop programs to offer comprehensive student support that addresses student achievement, attitude (behavior), and attendance utilizing established screening and early identification processes.

VI. Monitoring and Policy Review

Monitoring. The superintendent or designee will ensure compliance with established district-wide nutrition, physical activity, and wellness policies. In each school, the principal or designee will ensure compliance with those policies in his/her school.

School food service staff, at the school or district level, will ensure compliance with nutrition policies within school food service areas.

The superintendent or designee will develop a summary report every year on district-wide compliance with the district's established nutrition, physical activity and social-emotional welling, policies, based on input from schools within the district. That report will be provided to the school board.

Areas of interest for monitoring should include but are not limited to:

o Description of the district's nutrition education, physical education, and health education efforts

o Number of minutes of physical education instruction offered at each grade span

o Results of the state's physical fitness test (Fitnessgram)

o An analysis of the nutritional content of meals served based on a sample of menus

o Student participation rates in school meal programs

o Feedback from food service personnel, school administrators, the Coordinated School Health Program Advisory Committee, parents/guardians, students, and other appropriate persons

o Any other indicators recommended by the Superintendent and approved by the Board

The Wellness Advisory Committee will review initiatives and make recommendations that support student and staff health through the comprehensive programs promoting healthy eating, physical activity and social emotional well-being.

Regulation ELK GROVE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

approved: May 17, 2006 Elk Grove, California

revised: August 5, 2015